Soil

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Soil Amendment Myths

WYOMING, by the U. Wyoming Extension (with cautions that apply everywhere) Gypsum and lime are common garden store products. Learn why they’re not useful in Wyoming soils.

Popular Gardening Tips You Can Probably Ignore (Epsom Salts, Mycorrhizae, Compost Accelerators)

CHICAGO AREA by Patrick Dolan of One Yard Revolution There are a lot of very popular gardening recommendations out there that most of us can probably ignore without any downside at all. Here are 5. If you shop on Amazon, you can support OYR simply by clicking this link (bookmark it too) before shopping: http://www.amazon.com/?tag=oneya-20 0:52 Fertilize …Read more »

Cover Crop Trick

BROOKLYN, NY, by Stacey Murphy Published on Sep 28, 2017 If you’re trying to maximize your harvest, it won’t be long until you become obsessed with improving your soil fertility. And if you have a small garden space and/or a short growing season… you may find yourself wondering if you should plant more fall crops …Read more »

Build Amazing Fertile Garden Soil Using Free and Local Resources in your Mulch or Compost

ALBERTA, CANADA By Stephen Legaree of Alberta Urban Garden Simple Organic and Sustainable How to build soil fertility for the perfect garden soil for free! It is fall here in Alberta and that means the summer crops are done and some of the garden beds are done for the year. Just because there is nothing goring …Read more »

How I Interplant Nitrogen Fixing Cover Crops & Food Crops for the Fall

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS AREA, by Patrick Dolan of One Yard Revolution Published on Aug 3, 2017 As I harvest crops planted this spring, I interplant nitrogen fixing cover crops and food crops for the fall, ensuring a continuous harvest and an ample supply of nitrogen. Premium Soil Builder Mix: https://www.groworganic.com/soil-buil… If you shop on Amazon, you can …Read more »

Building Soil Fertility with Fall & Winter Cover Crops/Green Manures

CHICAGO AREA By Patrick Dolan of One Yard Revolution Frugal & Sustainable Organic Gardening Cover crops, or green manures, have become a very important part of our low cost and sustainable soil fertility program. In late summer we plant a variety of cold hardy legumes, along with cayuse oats. These crops fix nitrogen in the …Read more »

Cover Crops as Green Manure Improve your Soil EZ and Cheap

ALBERTA, CANADA, by Stephen Legaree of Alberta Urban Garden Simple Organic and Sustainable Published on Aug 17, 2014 On today’s episode we are going to talk about Green manure or cover crops. Even though it is nice and warm outside it is time in Zone 3 to start thinking about the fall. As such we …Read more »

Cover Crops for Backyard Gardens: Why, When, What, How to Plant

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA By CaliKim Garden and Home DIY Cover crops for backyard gardens – why, when, what and how to plant them in your garden beds. Cover crops are an easy way to add organic matter and nutrients to your soil. Plant them now so your garden beds are ready for spring! MIgardener’s White Dutch …Read more »

Planting Cover Crops in Containers – Kale and Turnips

TENNESSEE, by Aaron Thatcher of Planting Freedom Published on Jun 7, 2012 PROTECT YOUR PLANTS! Here is one way i used to not only grow more food but also protect the dirt and root systems from heat.

Simple Ways to Improve your Garden Soil Using Fallen Leaves

CINCINNATI, OHIO From Crista’s Garden: In this video, I will show you how I use fall leaves in my garden. They are a free resource with so many benefits for your garden! I forgot to mention in this video not to use leaves from the Black Walnut tree as they contain Juglone, a organic compound …Read more »

Removing Cover Crops

OKLAHOMA, by Oklahoma State’s Oklahoma Gardening Oklahoma Gardening’s Kim Toscano demonstrates how to remove cover crops that have been used to prevent erosion during the winter or fallow months.

7 Ways to Use Leaves in Your Garden

GROWVEG in the U.K. Would you like to save time, effort and money spent on your garden while also improving your harvest? Clearing up fallen leaves is hard work, but those leaves can protect and feed your plants, as well as reducing the amount of watering, weeding and digging you need to do next year. In …Read more »